Articles & Blogs

Grow, Make, Eat, and Imbibe — Harvard Alumni Promote the Local Origins of Edible Goods
By Nell Porter Brown, Harvard Magazine, Jan/Feb 2014
… As the Truro Agricultural Fair’s popularity grew, so did the vision. The event now falls under the nonprofit umbrella organization Sustainable CAPE- Center for Agricultural Preservation & Education. The group focuses on teaching children that “food is directly linked to your body, your community, your world,” Randolph says. “They are concentric circles.” It runs the Truro Educational Farmers’ Market and helped get local food served for a series of lunches at the Truro school, where it also plans to fund a “farmer-in-the-school” position, and grows gardens with students….

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Truro Farmers’ Market Selling Out at Cape Cod’s Newest Farmers Market as National Farmers Market Week Kicks off August 3rd
By Gus Schumacher, Executive VP Wholesome Wave, August 6, 2013
My wife and I stopped by almost too late at Cape Cod’s newest farmers’ market in Truro on July 28th, as some 600 shoppers had already purchased most of the products by 11 am. Francie Randolph and her team of dedicated  volunteers opened the market on June 17th, running each Monday from 8 am to noon. We barely managed to purchase ingredients for a healthy lunch before most producers sold out. Randolph said some farmers had to make quick trips back to their nearby Truro farms to replenish supplies as demand was so strong…we also noticed families using their USDA Food and Nutrition Senior and WIC Farmers Market Vouchers. Truro farmer and market co-founder David Dewitt highlighted  his just picked fresh Kale and salad greens to a couple using their vouchers for the first time at his market stand. Randolph and Dewitt are also working with USDA to access a Debit/Credit/EBT wireless machine to encourage families on SNAP food stamps to use their benefits at the Truro market for healthy, local and very fresh fruits and vegetables.

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Larry King Heart to Heart
By Tamsin Smith, Huffington Post, May 17, 2013
Francie Randolph founded Sustainable CAPE to demonstrate the direct link between local food, wellness, and protection of precious land and water resources. She uses also uses games to educate school kids and families to become agents of change, who take charge of their own health and the health of the planet. These things are, of course, connected and events like the Zucchini 500 vegetable race bring delicious together with sustainable and joyful.

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Truro Farmers Update MA Agriculture Board Chairman, Frank Dabney, at Harvest New England Agricultural Marketing Conference
By Gus Schumacher, Executive VP Wholesome Wave, February 27, 2013
Founders of the new Truro Agriculture Fair, Randolph, Rein and DeWitt told Ag Board Chair Fred Dabney of the early success of the first new Massachusetts Ag Fair to be started in decades (in Truro), a fair which attracted some 7,500 visitors.  They also apprised him of the recent town approval of the new Truro Agriculture Commission, chaired by Dewitt-Krieger of Dave’s Greens Farm. Randolph says that Truro recently approved the establishment of a new pilot Educational Farmer’s Market on town-owned land.  The initiative is unique in that farmers will work with Sustainable CAPE to educate shoppers on issues about health or sustainability that farmers selling at the market feel are important to share…Randolph and her colleagues plan to make the new market accessible to all income levels through a wireless EBT machine that accepts SNAP benefits.  They are considering instituting their own incentives program which would make local fresh produce even more affordable for SNAP customers. Such nutrition benefit incentives would be similar to Wholesome Wave’s Double Value Coupon Program. They are also considering installing a prominent donation box for all to donate fresh fruit and vegetables to the local food pantry; a possible future collaboration with Health Centers to offer Healthy Prescriptions – a program that funds vouchers for at-risk patients for fresh food; and a potential coupon program for schoolchildren to bring their parents to the new Educational Farmer’s Market.

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We’re Fighting Obesity Here at Home with a Carrot-and-Zucchini Approach

by Senator Dan Wolf , Beacon Hill Round-up, Vol. XX, No. 4, Fall 2012
When it comes to improving the health of our kids, we’re learning that the carrot-and-stick approach is not always best; the carrot-and-zucchini approach is better. That’s the thought behind a statewide Farm to School program that has shown remarkable success since its inception in 2004…The Cape’s smallest town, Truro, has been setting a big example, led in part by Truro resident and artist Francie Randolph, the founding director of Sustainable CAPE, the acronym standing for “Center for Agricultural Preservation and Education.” Francie and her group have been connecting some very important dots, bringing healthier food into the school system while at the same time engaging kids in farms and farming. “We’re actually growing snacks for the kids, and the kids are helping grow food for themselves,” Ms. Randolph says. “That makes it fun, the kids are interested in it, and next thing you know, they’re munching on kale instead of chips–because they helped harvest that kale!”…

This kind of grassroots effort can make a profound difference in the health of our children. Fighting obesity and early onset diabetes really is a battle for the hearts and minds of our families, a matter of lifestyle and values more than prescriptions and medication. Making it fun to eat well, educating everyone about how food makes it to our tables and how cool it is to be a grower, will accomplish far more than warnings and wagging fingers.

And there’s an even broader connection: This kind of initiative and thinking is key to making our communities healthier in many other ways. For example, grow fresh and grow local has an equivalent in energy because smaller scale solar and wind projects are a much better alternative than nuclear power or foreign oil. There’s a financial analogy as well. Relying on local banks and lending institutions is far preferable to allowing large corporations to control our economy.

So, hats off to everyone in the Farm to School movement, who are focused on carrots rather than sticks. From the State House to the greenhouse, we’ll do our best to support the movement.

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Zucchini 500
Pinewood Derby Times Volume 12, Issue 3, October 31, 2012
“Truro, MA – You’ve heard of the Indy 500 over Memorial Day, but what about Truro’s Zucchini 500 over Labor Day? Billed as The Greatest Spectacle in Vegetable Racing, the event took place on Sunday, September 2 at Sustainable CAPE’s Truro Agricultural Fair in Truro Center.”

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The Karagoz Oyunlari hit the Truro Agricultural Fair
Slowly-by-Slowly, September 15, 2012
…It was, you see, time to walk the dog with M. and head over to the Truro Agricultural Fair – a once a year event where the best in flora and fauna produced on the Cape Tip are displayed with pride – before all groove to the sounds of Grateful-Dead-inspired bands of yore in the late summer sunshine. The puppets were particularly excited that day, you see, as there was rumor that the “Sultan of Chickens” was present at the fair that day – and was considered to be the best bet for “best in show” at the Ag fair.

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Celebrate Massachusetts Agriculture Fairs
Commissioner Gregory C. Watson, Department of Agricultural Resources, September 15, 2012
I also recently visited the Truro Agricultural Fair to partake in the “Zucchini 500” 2012 Race.
I consider state agricultural fairs a great Massachusetts tradition because, according to Massachusetts Agricultural Fairs Association, the first agricultural fair in the U.S. was held in Pittsfield in 1814. Today Massachusetts hosts 40 annual agricultural fairs. They fall into one of five categories: major fairs, community fairs, youth fairs, livestock shows and grange fairs. I wish I could visit each one every year! Each is unique but all are bound together by the common thread of the Commonwealth’s rich and proud agrarian heritage.

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Animals & Veggies: Truro Agricultural Fair 2012
Style Carrot, September 9, 2012
It’s official. Stopping by the Truro Ag Fair on the Sunday of Labor Day weekend is our last Cape hurrah before heading home to Boston at the end of each summer. I seem to have skipped posting about it in 2010, but in 2009 I admired the bunnies, and 2011 was all about alpacas. This year I oohed and ahed over the pigs.

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2012 Truro Agricultural Fair named “Place to Be” by Boston Globe
By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein, Boston Globe Sept. 5, 2012
The Truro Agricultural Fair was the place to be over the weekend. Actress Lili Taylor of “Mystic Pizza” (and, more recently, “Six Feet Under”) fame was watching the pie-eating contest while writer/editor Daniel Okrent was spied carrying around a large plant. We didn’t see Dan Winslow, but the former chief legal counsel to Governor Mitt Romney was there because he tweeted about watching the fair’s newest feature — the Zucchini 500…

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Day 152: 2012 Truro Agricultural Fair
365 Things to do in Cape Cod: September 2, 2012
The Harvest Market tables offer a wide variety of the fresh, local goods available. All farmers and harvesters aim not only to sell directly to the fairgoer, but to offer knowledge & expertise as well. Come buy fantastic food just harvested from the land or sea – and learn how you can help sustain our community’s health and environment!

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The Historic Harvest Garden
National Park Service, June 2012
“In front of the Atlantic Research Center (ARC) Classroom you will find the Historic Harvest Garden, a project of Truro non-profit Sustainable CAPE (Center for Agricultural Preservation and Education) supported by NPS and AmeriCorps.
In 2011 Local and Native American youth were brought together to plant seeds sourced back to the 1600s in a raised garden bed. Planting the “three sisters” of corn, squash, and beans, showed the agricultural knowledge which was transferred from the Native Americans to the Pilgrims in 1620, enabling their later survival in Plymouth. “

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The Cape’s Community Gardens
Edible Cape Cod
“The popular year-old Community Children’s Garden is next to the Truro Library; it is the result of a partnership between Sustainable Cape, Truro Recreation and the Truro Library and consists of one big 16x16 garden. This garden is all about kids as it hosts an after-school program, a summer program and a 4-H program. The kids eat what they pick, using some of the produce to create snacks for the after-school program…”

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Alpacas are Adorable
Style Carrot, September 11, 2011                                                                                                                                                 “The 3rd annual Truro Agricultural Fair drew a huge crowd last weekend on the Outer Cape. From pie-eating contests and three-legged races, to the Barnyard Beauty Contest (you vote with locally grown beans) and the fiddlers on the bandstand, to the abundance of ripe tomatoes and an early crop of pumpkins, this country-like gathering was a rocking scene for this otherwise quiet beach town…”
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Cape Cod Photo Album – Truro Ag Fair

Classic photos of The Ag Fair, the primary images chosen to depict Truro

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Agriculture, Activism & Art in Truro: One Woman’s Journey
Edible Cape Cod, Summer 2011
“Lucille Ball once said, ‘If you want something done, ask a busy person to do it. The more things you do, the more you can do.’ With most of us feeling so harried nowadays, it’s hard to find anyone willing and able to donate their time in the community. Truro resident Francie Randolph is one of these extraordinary people making a difference…”

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Francie Randolph Talks About the Power of Creating a Children’s Garden
The Motor Story, Summer 2011
“The Truro Children’s Community Garden really grew out of the Ag Fair. We had many children’s events at the fair to involve children in the festivities: Pie Eating Contest, crafts related to agriculture, old fashioned games like potato sack races. The activities brought the community together. When we started to talk about the possibility of a Children’s Garden, folks who participated in the fair donated supplies to build the garden…”

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Truro’s Greener Future – Truro Ag Commission Established

TRNTA, July 21, 2012
“In July, the BoS took another important step forward to solidify Truro’s Ag future, by establishing a Truro Agricultural Commission under its new Chair, Dave DeWitt. Many know Dave as an organic farmer in town and as part of the leadership of the Truro Ag Fair, along with Francie Randolph. In the Fall 2010 TNRTA newsletter, we urged the local community to think green and think Ag(riculture), and we began to “seed” an agricultural future as a serious part of the economy and the rural character of the Town. We have also supported efforts to move this forward by Truro groups such as Sustainable Cape and the Truro Ag Fair. By giving support to other like minds in the community who share this perspective – some who proceeded us and some who joined in recently – this common vision has gained momentum. Watch this space for ways that part- time residents can be involved hands-on in making Truro grow green!”

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Truro Agricultural Fair – Truro, Massachusetts
Travel New England, June 7, 2011
“The Truro Agricultural Fair is a fair to celebrate agriculture, aquaculture, fishing, and farming on Cape Cod. This old fashioned country fair started in 2009 and has been held every year since in the late summer…”
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Historic Harvest Garden
National Parks Service
“Driving along Old Dewline Road, Highlands Center visitors can now see stalks of corn growing tall in front of the Atlantic Research Center (ARC) Classroom. This Historic Harvest Garden is a project of the newly formed Truro non-profit Sustainable CAPE (Center for Agricultural Preservation and Education). Local and Native American youth are brought together to plant seeds sourced back to the 1600s in a raised garden bed. Planting the “three sisters” of corn, squash, and beans, shows the agricultural knowledge which was
transferred from the Native Americans to the Pilgrims in 1620, enabling their later survival in Plymouth…”

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Flowers and Food: Truro Agricultural Fair
Style Carrot, September 12, 2009
“Last weekend, the last of summer 09, was also the first for the Truro Agricultural Fair. Truro is a tiny town on the Outer Cape. “Town” consists of a general market, a post office and a fish shop. Oh, and the Green, where there’s a bandstand for Thursday night concerts and a croquet set for spirited games between older folk…”

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